SPoRT Tiled Mapping Service Allows Decision Makers and the Public Unique Views of Super Typhoon Bopha

SPoRT’s Disaster Response Team sprung into action this morning to produce imagery in response to Super Typhoon Bopha as it approaches The Philippines and the Southeast Asia mainland.  To better serve SPoRT’s partners, end-users, and the general public, this imagery has been integrated into SPoRT’s new Tiled Mapping Service (TMS).  The TMS allows users the capability to view the highest resolution data using only their web browser.  This service is also helpful for disaster response teams that are working in the field as browsers on tablets or smartphones can seamlessly pan and zoom SPoRT imagery without the need for a specific decision support system, lots of computational horsepower, or fast data download speeds.  In addition, users can adjust the transparency of different data sets in order to compare features from multiple instruments.  The transparency can be adjusted by clicking on the text associated with the displayed product in the layer tree and then using the scroll bar in the upper left of the display to adjust the transparency.

Below is an example of using the TMS to layer Day Night Band (DNB) imagery from NASA/NOAA/DoD’s Visibile Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) valid at around 1700 UTC on 2 December 2012 and the 89 GHz RGB product from NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager.  In the VIIRS image, cloudy features appear as white even in the middle of the night as moonlight is reflected from the cloud tops.  Here, Super Typhoon Bopha can be seen in the bottom right of the VIIRS swath.  However, the edge of the scan bisects the storm.  To get a more full picture of the storm–and to learn additional information about where active convection is occurring–the passive microwave 89 GHz RGB product can be overlain.  With the transparencies appropriately adjusted, one can see both the extent of the cloud field associated with the storm (white features in the VIIRS DNB imagery) along with areas that are most convectively-active (red areas in PM RGB).

SPoRT continues to process additional datasets to add into the system, so check back for updates as new satellite data become available.

Example of overlaying NASA satellite datasets in SPoRT's TMS.  Passive Microwave RGB imagery from 0200 UTC on 3 December overlays VIIRS DNB  imagery from 1700 UTC on 2 December for Super Typhoon Bopha as it approaches The Phillipines

Example of overlaying NASA satellite datasets in SPoRT’s TMS. Passive Microwave RGB imagery from TRMM is overlaid on VIIRS DNB imagery to show where most active convection is occurring with Super Typhoon Bopha as it approaches The Philippines.

High-resolution VIIRS DNB Imagery of Super Typhoon Bopha from SPoRT TMS displayed using a handheld device.

High-resolution VIIRS DNB Imagery of Super Typhoon Bopha from SPoRT TMS displayed using a handheld device.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s