VIIRS DNB Imagery Captures Typhoon Bopha Moments Before First Landfall

Typhoon Bopha made initial landfall in the Southeastern Philippines during the local overnight hours on 4 December 2012.  Due to its landfall occurring at night, traditional visibile satellite imagery would not have been available.  However, NASA/NOAA/DoD’s Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) features a Day Night Band (DNB), which detects cloud features using reflected moonlight and enables forecasters the ability to see the storm even when no sunlight is present.  The VIIRS DNB captured the size and intensity of the storm moments before this its initial landfall along the eastern coast of the Island of Mindanao, which resulted in wind and landslide damage to that region.  Brought into SPoRT’s Tiled Mapping Service (TMS) and making a slight adjustment to the transparency of the VIIRS image, one can see both details of the storm’s eye and its proximity to land features.

VIIRS DNB Imagery at 1710 UTC on 3 December shows proximity of Typhoon Bopha to The Phillipines prior to landfall.

VIIRS DNB Imagery at 1710 UTC on 3 December shows proximity of Typhoon Bopha to The Philippines prior to landfall.

2 thoughts on “VIIRS DNB Imagery Captures Typhoon Bopha Moments Before First Landfall

  1. Great post. Nice capability to have image semi-transparent. If a user of the Tiled Map Server loads SSMI 89Ghz from 12/3 and 12/4 one sees a nice change in the structure of the rain bands before and after landfall.

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