Nighttime Microphysics RGB Helps With Tennessee Valley Fog Coverage

It’s been a pretty foggy morning across the Huntsville metro area!  But if you’re looking for insight on the extent of the fog from early morning GOES visible imagery, good luck!  Mid-level clouds were obscuring lower-level features for a large portion of the region.

8 June 2013 - 1145 UTC - GOES-East Visible Imagery

8 June 2013 – 1145 UTC – GOES-East Visible Imagery

Fortunately, the earlier VIIRS pass gave a much better perspective on the fog, despite being on the very edge of the early morning pass.

8 June 2013 - 0828 UTC - VIIRS RGB Nighttime Microphysics

8 June 2013 – 0828 UTC – VIIRS RGB Nighttime Microphysics

Some nice details stand out in this image, particularly the multiple river valleys that can be picked out across north Alabama and middle Tennessee.  This implies that the fog may be a little more localized than previously thought, and agrees nicely with the rapid improvement of visibility that is being reported after sunrise.

5 thoughts on “Nighttime Microphysics RGB Helps With Tennessee Valley Fog Coverage

  1. Thanks for the post Brian! I am convinced that the RGBs are the future of satellite imagery and eagerly await their availability on the GOES-R satellites. BTW…was the VIIRS RGB image above ultimately used to modify or generate any forecast products?

  2. No, not explicitly, Kris. This was more of a situational awareness use. I think we tend to get a little tunnel-visioned on what we experience on our way in to work, not to mention the few spots where we have observation points, so I was looking for something to give me an idea of how widespread the fog really was. The RGB image validated the fact that it was likely concentrated in a few specific places, so when visibilities started improving at all of my obs sites, I was more confident that I could let the advisory expire as scheduled.

  3. Brian, we are glad to see that HUN is able to make use of the full resolution web graphics that SPoRT creates on a local domain for several inland WFOs in the Southern Region. With HUN using AWIPS II this has been our only option to provide unique satellite imagery. I hope others will be able to follow your lead. I second Gary’s comments and the dialog helps me to confirm how SPoRT / NWS collaborations are meeting a specific need.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s