GOES-R CI and PGLM During the AWC Summer Experiment

The GOES-R CI (developed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville) and NASA SPoRT’s Pseudo-GLM have been participating with the Aviation Weather Center’s Summer Experiment since last week.  Yesterday (August 20th) had an interesting event with both.

At 1432 UTC (Figure 1), the GOES-R CI was providing a modest probability of convection along the Walker and Jefferson County border (highlighted by the yellow scallops).

20130820_1432CI

The first signs of radar reflectivity occurred at 1532 UTC (Figure 2).  The reflectivity had not yet reached 35 dBZ, which is the official definition for convective initiation.

20130820_1536bref

Figure 2: Initial radar reflectivity at 1536 UTC.

The CI algorithm strongly highlighted this particular region at 1545 UTC (Figure 3), when the probability reached into the 80% range.  What is particularly interesting was that this region was the only one across North Alabama that received such a high probability.  The CI probability would be verified 30 minutes later when the radar reflectivity exceeded 35 dBZ (not shown).

20130820_1545CIAfter this large probability of CI, the first PGLM flash was observed at 1550 UTC (Figure 4).

20130820_1550pglm

Figure 4: First PGLM flash observations at 1550 UTC.

The first cloud-to-ground strike was observed at 1622 UTC (Figure 5).

20130820_1622pglm

Figure 5: Pseudo-GLM flash density at 1622 UTC with the first observed cloud-to-ground strike.

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