Snow Cover Blankets Northeastern New Mexico

A potent winter storm system impacted portions of New Mexico on March 26, 2016, ending an extended stretch of very dry weather. Snowfall amounts of 3 to 9 inches were reported from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains eastward across the northeast plains. The MODIS and VIIRS satellite products proved useful for illustrating the extent of snow cover in both the daytime and nighttime scenes. The images below are graphical briefings posted to the NWS Albuquerque web page and shared via Twitter after this much needed snowfall event.

Graphical briefing showing the extent of snow cover during the nighttime and daytime periods on March 27, 2016.

Graphical briefing (part one) showing the extent of snow cover during the nighttime and daytime periods on March 27, 2016.

Graphical briefing showing the extent of snow cover through RGBs on March 27, 2016.

Graphical briefing (part two) showing the extent of snow cover through RGBs on March 27, 2016.

3 thoughts on “Snow Cover Blankets Northeastern New Mexico

  1. Thanks for the post Albuquerque! Good use of the data and nice job of explaining the imagery and sharing with your customers. Especially interesting is that the Day-Night Band RGB showed the extent of the snow before it was available via the standard visible and snow/cloud RGB imagery.

  2. The NESDIS Snowfall Rate (SFR) Product also did a good job of sensing the snow-water equivalent (SWE) March 26 into March 27 with last good image on 27th with METOP-B 0327z pass with max instantaneous snow-water equivalent rates of close to 4 mm/hr (0.16″/hr) in the NW TX panhandle. Also the N-18 0039z pass on the 27th that had max SWE ext NE NM into the NW TX and W OK panhandles and close to the border of SE CO. Looking late on March 26 the SFR showed good rates centered on S Central CO into NE NM with the SNPP 2031z and N-19 2133z passes. All clearly delineated on the MODIS True color and SnowCloud RGB and Visible channel later in the AM on March 27 and the VIIRS day/night RGB early AM of March 27.

  3. A quick mention that the MODIS Snow Cloud RGB also shows the clouds over the snow cover, which is hard to see in visible or True Color RGB imagery. In addition, it would be interesting to see one of these images next to a model initialization of the surface for this region. Did the subsequent model runs have this same extent of snow cover? If not, was the model forecast affected in some way?

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s