Landsat DAT imagery helps determine tornado tracks

On December 23, 2015, an unusual early winter season tornado outbreak struck much of the Tennessee Valley. Several tornadic supercell thunderstorms developed across northern Mississippi and western Tennessee in the afternoon hours, producing several large long-track tornadoes that unfortunately resulted in numerous fatalities and injuries. These same storms then moved rapidly east-northeastward at up to 70 mph across Middle Tennessee during the evening, spawning 4 tornadoes and causing 2 deaths and 7 injuries. Prior to this tornado outbreak, only 7 tornadoes had ever been recorded across Middle Tennessee since the 1800s, easily making this the largest and worst December tornado outbreak in Middle Tennessee history.

linden

OHX radar base reflectivity (left) & storm-relative velocity (right) at 623 pm CST on December 23, 2015 showing a supercell thunderstorm with an EF2 tornado in progress southeast of Linden, TN

NWS Nashville sent out three storm survey teams to evaluate all of the damage from these tornadoes on Christmas Eve and again on Christmas Day. Unfortunately, the affected areas were very rural and mostly inaccessible to the storm survey teams, with few roads available to evaluate damage indicators or determine beginning and end points. Thankfully, Landsat 8 imagery was available in the online Damage Survey Interface (DAT beta version) that depicted the swaths of blown down forests along the tornado paths that tracked through areas where the storm survey teams could not access. Landsat imagery allowed NWS Nashville personnel to extend two of the tornado paths by several more miles than originally estimated.

landsat

Landsat 8 panchromatic imagery (contrast enhanced) from March 22, 2016 showing the damage swath from an EF2 tornado that killed 2 people southeast of Linden, TN. The beginning point of this tornado was adjusted ~2 miles further southwest than originally estimated based on the satellite imagery.

2 thoughts on “Landsat DAT imagery helps determine tornado tracks

  1. Nice example Sam!! Thrilled to see that imagery from approximately 3 months after the event can still add value, especially in these rural areas!

  2. Yes, it’s good to include that the imagery lead to a more proper analysis and extension of the tornado tracks. Nice work Sam, and thanks for posting!

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