A GOES-16 Multispectral View of the Late Season Nor’easter

A high impact late season Nor’easter is unfolding across the Mid-Atlantic and New England today.  An enhanced view of the impressive storm is possible with multispectral (i.e. RGB) imagery since GOES-16 ABI has 16 bands available compared to legacy GOES sensors. Both the Day Land Cloud RGB (Fig. 1) and Air Mass RGB (Fig. 2) were developed by EUMETSAT and provided to European forecasters with the launch of Meteosat-8 SEVIRI in the early 2000s. These RGBs are part of the set of EUMETSAT RGB best practices that was later adopted by the WMO and today are widely used by other countries such as Japan and Australia who have access to Himawari-8 AHI derived RGB products.  NASA SPoRT has worked closely with the GOES-R/JPSS Proving Grounds to provide RGB products derived from MODIS, VIIRS, AVHRR, and AHI to NWS offices, National Centers, and the Operations Proving Ground to prepare forecasters for multispectral capabilities with GOES-16.  More recently, NASA SPoRT has been working with the Total Operational Weather Readiness – Satellites (TOWR-S) and the Satellite Enhancement Team to provide client-side RGB imagery to the National Weather Service for use in operations.  These are just two examples of GOES-16 ABI RGB imagery that will be available to NWS forecasters in the near future.  A brief explanation of each product is found in the caption and links to training resources are below.

GOES16_Storm_DLCe-20170314_155251

Fig. 1 Day Land Cloud RGB 14 March 2017 15:52 UTC.  Provides the ability to distinguish snow from clouds.  Snow appears cyan, low water clouds appear gray to dull white, and high ice clouds appear cyan.  Although snow and high ice clouds both appear cyan, snow can be distinguished since it remains stationary.

NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

GOES16_Storm_AM-20170314_155251

Fig. 2 Air Mass RGB 14 March 2017 15:52 UTC.  The Air Mass RGB was designed to anticipate rapid cyclogenesis by enhancing regions of anomalous potential vorticity near the jet stream in orange/red tones.  These regions indicate where warm, dry, ozone-rich stratospheric air is being pull downward by the jet stream, which can be in indication of rapid cyclogenesis.  Low-, mid-, and high-clouds can also be identified in the RGB. Low clouds appear blue/green, mid clouds appear tan, and high clouds appear bright white.  Compare the clouds in the Air Mass RGB with the clouds in the Day Land Cloud RGB above to identify cloud height.

NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

For more information on the Day Land Cloud and Air Mass RGBs, including interpretation please see:

NASA SPoRT Natural Color RGB Quick Guide (PDF and Interactive)

EUMETSAT Natural Color RGB Interpretation Guide

NASA SPoRT Air Mass RGB Quick Guide (PDF and Interactive)

EUMETSAT Air Mass RGB Interpretation Guide

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