Category 5 Hurricane #Irma As Observed by the #GOES16 #GLM

Below is a sample image from the linked mp4 movie of hurricane Irma at 1501 UTC immediately afer the National Hurricane Center upgraded the intensity to 180 mile per hour sustained winds.

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Hurricane Irma at 1501 UTC just after the National Hurricane Center upgraded the intensity to 180 miles per hour.  This figure shows the ABI 10.3 micron infrared imagery with the corresponding GLM 8 km event density (to show spatial extent) and flash centroid points.  In this image 10 GLM flashes were observed.

This morning the National Hurricane Center upgraded hurricane Irma to a category 5 storm (7 AM Central, 1200 UTC).  By 10 AM Central (1500 UTC), the hurricane further intensified with maximum sustained winds of 180 miles per hour.  The linked mp4 movie covers just over 3 hours from ~1150 UTC through 1510 UTC.  The animation shows the ABI 10.3 micron infrared imagery (full disk, 15 minute resolution) and the GLM event density (to show spatial extent) and the flash centoid points.  This display is in AWIPS and uses the combined event density and flash centroid plot recommended by the Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) along with the color curve developed by NASA SPoRT and tested at HWT.  Of note is to watch the location of lightning in the storm as it varies between the outer bands and the eyewall.

[29 MB] Hurricane Irma mp4 link

NOTE:  NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Monitoring Hurricane Harvey with the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)

Figure 1, below, shows a single image from the attached movie showing the Geostationary Lightning Mapper observations for Hurricane Harvey.

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Figure 1:  Example image from the attached movie from 0700 UTC on August 25, 2017 while Harvey is a Category 2 hurricane.  The image shows the 11.2 micron infrared imagery in grey scale (background) and the GLM group density (shaded) accumulated over 15 minutes.

The link to the animation below monitors Harvey from 1400 UTC on August 23, 2017 while it was still a remnant system coming off the Yucatan Peninsula through the initial landfall and heavy precipitation across Texas at 2345 UTC on August 27, 2017.  The animation shows the ABI 11.2 micron infrared imagery (using a greyscale color curve to emphasize GLM) as well as the GLM 8 km group density (using the SPoRT color curve tested at the Hazardous Weather Testbed and being prepared as the default, operational curve).  Given the length of time covered by the animation, the data are shown at 15 minute intervals.  Specifics on Harvey (i.e., maximum winds and minimum pressure) are from the National Hurricane Center’s product archive for this storm.  The link is for an mp4 movie and is approximately 62 MB in size.

[62 MB]  Hurricane Harvey mp4 link.

Several still images are shown below highlighting interesting features.

One feature is the distribution of the total lightning observations throughout the tropical cyclone and the magnitude of the lightning density.  Generally, the total lightning is not distributed throughout the entire storm, but concentrated in bands and sometimes in the eye wall, as seen in Figure 1.  Figure 1 can be compared to the early stages when Harvey was upgraded to a Tropical Storm (Figure 2), but also later where many times there is no lightning in the eye wall (Figure 3). Also, please note that the accumulations are for 15 minutes versus 1 or 2 minutes shown in severe weather cases.

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Figure 2:  This is the same as Figure 1, but for Tropical Storm Harvey at 0415 UTC on August 24, 2017.  

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Figure 3:  This is the same as Figure 1, but at 0815 UTC on August 25, 2017.  This is highlighting the distribution of total lightning is mainly in the convective bands and note in the eye wall.

Figure 4 shows Harvey as it makes landfall as a Category 4 hurricane.  Here, GLM group density values are on par with the outer convective bands as the eye wall makes landfall.

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Figure 4:  Same as Figure 1, but at 0215 UTC on August 26, 2017.  This image highlights the GLM group density observations in Hurricane Harvey’s eye wall as it makes landfall.

Lastly, after the initial landfall, Figure 5 shows a large increase in the magnitude and spatial area of the GLM group densities in the outer convective band as some of the catastrophic rain impacts the Houston, Texas region.

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Figure 5:  Same as Figure 1, but at 0245 UTC on August 27, 2017.  This image highlights the increased GLM group density magnitude and spatial extent during part of the catastrophic rains that impacted Houston, Texas.

NOTE:  NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) observes three tropical cyclones in the eastern Pacific

The large field of view of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) offers forecasters a new way to monitor tropical cyclones.  In particular, the GLM will offer the opportunity to monitor total lightning (i.e., cloud-to-ground and intra-cloud) trends over the entire life cycle of the system.

The past few days have offered a very interesting opportunity with three tropical cyclones in the eastern Pacific basin; Tropical Storm Greg, Hurricane Hilary, and Tropical Storm Irwin.  The movie covers from 1310 UTC on July 23 through 1610 UTC on July 24.  A few features are interesting to point out.  First, notice the amount of lightning activity and diurnal change associated with the storms across Mexico (upper right of movie) versus the activity with the three tropical systems.  Also, check out the location of the lightning in tropical systems and whether it is in the central core or the outer bands.

Figure 1 is a still from the linked mp4 movie that is approximately 37 megabytes in size.

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Figure 1:  A still image from 0600 UTC on 24 July 2017 showing Tropical Storms Greg and Irwin as well as Hurricane Hilary in the eastern Pacific basin.  The cyclones are viewed with ABI at the full disk, 15 minute temporal resolution (and intentionally darkened to make the lightning observations stand out) and the GLM 8 km, 5 minute group densities. (Please click on image to enlarge.)

[37 MB] GLM group density over three tropical cyclones

NOTE:  NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) over New Mexico

An interesting case using the GLM occurred over New Mexico from July 2.  The time period spans 00Z to 03Z for that day.  You can access an animation of the entire period at the following link.  (NOTE:  The animation is ~76 megabytes.  Several still images highlighting key points are shown below.)  This shows the GLM 8 km, 1 minute group density (upper left), ABI 11.2 micron IR (upper right), and the composite radar reflectivities from the Albuquerque, El Paso, and Cannon AFB radars.  (Apologies to the ABI as only the full disk imagery was archived and therefore only updates every 15 minutes.)  No NLDN or Earth Networks data are shown at this time as the data have not been added to the archive as of this writing.  A still image from the animation is shown in Figure 1.

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Figure 1:  A still image from the 00-03Z animation of the GLM 8 km, 1-minute group density (upper left), ABI full disk, 15-minute 11.2 micron IR (upper right), and composite radar reflectivity from Albuquerque, El Paso, and Cannon AFB (lower right) at 0133 UTC on July 2, 2017.

 

[76 MB] GLM over New Mexico (00-03Z, July 2, 2017)

 

The main emphasis is using the GLM in data sparse locations.  NOAA has a great graphic showing the available WSR-88D coverage across the United States (Figure 2). This example focus on New Mexico and the availability of four radars: Albuquerque (KABX), El Pasa (KEPZ), Holloman AFB (KHDX), and Cannon AFB (KFDX).  On this day, it is important to note that the Holloman radar was unavailable.

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Figure 2:  NOAA graphic showing the NEXRAD coverage in the continental United States below 10,000 Feet above ground level.

Several interesting features stand out during these three hours of data.  The first is in northwestern New Mexico and south of the Four Corners region.  At 0022 UTC, the GLM detected a small flash.  Five flashes occurred between 0022-0041 UTC and with a final flash at 0112 UTC.  Figure 3 shows a snap shot at 0036 UTC.  Figure 1 shows that this region of New Mexico has no radar coverage below 10,000 feet above ground level.  The composite reflectivity from the Albuquerque radar (ABX) hints at some activity at the limit of its range and the ABI observes a small region of cooler cloud tops.  Although very little lightning was observed, this can alert forecasters that convectively driven precipitation is occurring where it is otherwise difficult to observe via radar.  Also, a small amount of lightning can be observed in the storms in east-central New Mexico as well.

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Figure 3:  This is the same as Figure 1, but for 0036 UTC.  The yellow circles highlight the area of interest.

A similar case occurred at 0116 UTC (Figure 4) through 0136 UTC.  Again, a very weak, isolated cell as observed by the ABI and the El Paso (KEPZ) radar had an initial GLM lightning observation at 0116.  The storm never intensified beyond two dozen flashes, but persisted for 20 minutes before dissipating.  Also, while the GLM values are quite low, the brighter locations in the group density display highlight some of the stronger cells in the line of storms.

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Figure 4:  Same as Figure 1, but for 0116 UTC.  The yellow circles highlight the area of interest.

We also begin to see the areal extent of the lightning changing by 0152 UTC (Figure 5).  Now, the GLM group density observations are beginning to show lightning that is extending behind the main region of convection.  This is highlighting that even in a low flash rate environment, lightning can still extent tens of miles away from the convective core.

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Figure 5:  The same as Figure 1, but for 0152 UTC.  The small yellow and black circles highlight the location of the long flash.

The final example showing lightning initiation versus radar observations occurs at 0204 UTC (Figure 6) in central New Mexico.  As in Figures 2 and 3, a small lightning flash is observed in a region of weak radar composite reflectivity and cool, but not cold ABI cloud tops.  This highlights the initiation of the lightning threat that the radar composite reflectivity may not emphasize in relation to the active lightning associated with the stronger reflectivity regions.  The animation shows that this preceded the storm intensifying on radar and overall lightning activity through the end of the animation at ~0300 UTC.

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Figure 6:  Same as Figure 1, but at 0204 UTC.  The small yellow and black circles highlight the region of interest.

NOTE:  NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

 

GLM and Spatial Extent

One of the key advantages of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is the ability to observe the spatial extent of lightning.  The example here shows a 1 minute accumulation of the GLM event density over Louisianna and the Gulf of Mexico.  As an aside, a GLM event is any light detected by the GLM in a 2 ms time frame.  The GLM event density is compared with the corresponding radar reflectivity and the corresponding National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) cloud-to-ground flash density, also at 8 km.  Unlike the GLM, the NLDN identifies the location that a flash goes to ground.  (For this example, the data were accumulated into an 8 km grid that masks this NLDN capability.)  The GLM in this example shows that the total lightning is extending well beyond the locations where flashes are coming to ground into the stratiform region.  Additionally, in the southwestern portion of this example, the GLM is showing intra-cloud lightning over the Gulf of Mexico where there are no cloud-to-ground observations.

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GLM 8 km, 1 minute event density accumulation (left) with the corresponding radar reflectivity and 8 km, 1 minute NLDN cloud-to-ground density (right).

NOTE:  NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

GLM observes a long flash in Minnesota

One of the unique, new features of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper, or GLM, is the instrument’s ability to observe the spatial extent of lightning flashes.  This capability had been previously demonstrated with the ground-based lightning mapping arrays (LMAs).  The LMAs, however, only have a range of 200 km versus the GLM’s near hemispheric field of view.

The figure below shows the 1 min, 8 km GLM group density plot in AWIPS.  The GLM data have been intentionally made all yellow to highlight spatial extent only.  The GLM data are overlaid on the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) daytime convection red-green-blue (RGB) composite.  Here, the brighter, more yellow cloud tops indicate newer, more vigorous convection give large numbers of small, ice particles.  The redder cloud types are more mature/dissipating convection due to warmer cloud tops and amount of larger ice particles.  The GLM observes a flash that extends well behind the main convection (observed by the radar mosaic) and spans over 100 miles.  The extent is roughly between Duluth, Minnesota and International Falls, Minnesota.  This example shows the importance that the spatial extent of GLM observations can play in lightning safety as the threat of lightning is non-zero, even after the main convective line has passed.  This case will be analyzed further to compare with the National Lightning Detection Network and Earth Networks observations.

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Figure:  AWIPS screen capture of 1 min, 8 km GLM group densities (yellow, filled) overlaid on the ABI daytime convection RGB, along with the corresponding radar mosaic from NOAA (inset).  Annotations highlight the main features, particularly a long flash observed by the GLM (black dashed oval) that extended around 100 miles in the stratiform region across Minnesota on June 13, 2017.

NOTE:  NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. 

A Simple GLM Animation

The achievement of GLM reaching beta status is a big hurdle for the instrument as it prepares to become operational later this year.  SPoRT has been testing the GLM data feed since it started yesterday.  Part of the process has been to put together quick look imagery and animations to test out display and color curve options.  A simple animation was assembled from 8:15-9:45 PM (Central) as storms moved across Tennessee.  The animation highlights the strongest storm cores with the most lightning (darkest colors) along with several long flashes that can be seen on the northern and western edges of the storm.  Several severe wind reports were recorded in this region.

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Animation:  8 km GLM group density centered on Tennessee from 8:15-9:45 PM (Central) on July 5, 2017.  Animation courtesy of Paul Meyer.

NOTE:  NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.