Dust RGB analyzes “dryline” for 3/23/17

Dust RGB analyzes “dryline” for 3/23/17

 

The Dust RGB, originally from EUMETSAT and a capability of GOES-R/ABI, can be helpful in identifying features other than dust, including drylines. A dryline represents a sharp boundary at the surface between a dry air mass and moist air mass where there is a sudden change in dew point temperatures. In this event from 3/23/17, a dryline in eastern New Mexico and west Texas is distinguishable via the Dust RGB imagery animation from GOES-16 (Fig. 1), while a large dust plume (magenta) is impacting areas further west. Note that the visible imagery (Fig. 2) shows clouds forming along the dryline, but these clouds drift downwind toward the northeast as they mature, away from the dryline itself, making it difficult to monitor the dryline position.  However, the dryline position can easily be seen via the color difference of the Dust RGB across the boundary of dry and moist air, and in fact, the dryline appears fairly stationary or moves in a slight westward direction, opposite of the cloud motion.  In situ observations (Fig. 3) are a primary tool for monitoring the dryline location, but the advantage of satellite imagery is an increased spatial and temporal resolution for forecasters.

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Figure 1. GOES-16 Dust RGB valid from 2022 to 2322 UTC, on 23 March 2017 centered on extreme western Texas.  Dryline seen in color difference of cloud-free area in eastern New Mexico and west Texas while dust plume is in magenta shades.

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Figure 2. GOES-16 Visible (0.64u) channel valid from 2027 to 2322 UTC on 23 March 2017 as in Figure 1.

For the above and subsequent images/animations: NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

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Figure 3. METAR station plot of surface observations at 2143 UTC on 23 March 2017 centered over New Mexico.

The ability to identify drylines using the Dust RGB gives the forecaster the capability to analyze these boundaries in ways not seen before. In the Dust RGB (Fig. 4), the surface area on the dry side is seen as a purple color (i.e. increased red contribution), and the moist side appears more blue (i.e. less red). This dryline can be noted more easily than in visible imagery (Fig. 5) due to the sensitivity of the 12.3 micron channel used in the 12.3 – 10.35 micron difference within the Dust RGB red component.  The 12.3 micron channel goes from warmer to cooler brightness temperatures with changes in density from very dry to very moist air. The blue contribution is consistent on each side of the line because the surface temperature, and hence the 10.35 micron channel, does not change much from either side of the dryline. There is limited ability to identify drylines using high resolution visible imagery, as seen in the Midland WFO Graphicast (Fig. 6) where cumulus clouds are documented forming along the dryline. Unfortunately, visible imagery is only useable during daylight hours and a user is dependent on cloud features along the dryline in order to analyze its position. However, aside from the obvious value of the color difference in cloud free areas to depict the dryline, the Dust RGB, is viable both during daytime and nighttime hours.

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NtMicro RGB: Fog vs Stratus

NtMicro RGB: Fog vs Stratus

A veritable buffet of things to digest are occurring in this Nighttime Microphysics RGB animation from 0600 to 1000 UTC in the early morning of 3/28/17 where multi-state impacts of stratus and fog are seen (Fig 1). In blue/aqua to gray shades, the low cloud features are developing over the central CONUS while being sandwiched between Spring-time cyclones in the East and West.  The massive spreading of the stratus and fog can’t be missed and numerous METAR observations across the central CONUS verified the aviation hazards.

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Figure 1. Nighttime Microphysics RGB from GOES-16 at 0602 to 0957 UTC on 28 March 2017 over the U.S.

For the above and subsequent images/animations: NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Focusing on the Tennessee and Lower Mississippi Valley regions, the fast motion of the animation from 0900 to 1130 UTC allows one to see the development of fog while other stratus clouds  pass to the east/northeast (Fig 2.).  Note that fog develops in the various low-lying areas, particularly eastern Tennessee valleys.  There is also a separate push of fog, noted by the black dotted oval of Figure 3, that moves southward along the back side of the eastern cyclone.  The METAR stations in the oval show the lowest visibility observations occurring in this area of southern and western Tennessee as well as northern Alabama.  A bit further upstream (north) from the push of fog there is a layer of very low stratus also moving southward and causing MFVR to IFR conditions.  With the large amount of precipitation from the previous day and relatively light winds overnight, a variety of fog and stratus developed over a wide area as the cyclone passed.  While not extremely common there are instances where fog develops even with  low stratus present overhead.  One can see this in central Missouri where fog is reported but the RGB shows stratus with large water droplets at their tops.  Fog below stratus was experienced at times in northern Alabama as well.

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Figure 2. Nighttime Microphysics RGB from GOES-16 at 0902 to 1122 UTC on 28 March 2017 centered over western Tennessee and covering the Tennessee and Upper Mississippi Valleys.

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Figure 3. METAR station plot from the Aviation Weather Center ADDS site (left) and the Nighttime Microphysics RGB.  Both from near 1100 UTC with annotations of fog and stratus locations and movement.  Blue arrow in METAR shows direction of movement and shared black dotted oval notes locations of lowest visibility reports.

It’s Dust (RGB) Season!

It’s Dust (RGB) Season!

A large dust plume occurred over the southwest CONUS on 23 March 2017 as high winds lofted surface materials from the Mexican plateau across the border toward Texas and New Mexico.  Blowing dust events are common in the Spring in this region given the frequency of strong cyclones passing over dry land with sparse vegetation at this time.  For this event the dust plume could be detected during the day in visible imagery and even infrared single channel imagery from the newly launched GOES-16 satellite; however, the high resolution visible imagery traditionally used to monitor dust is not valid after sunset and through the overnight period.  The nighttime impacts of the dust plume eventually extended to locations downstream in Colorado, Oklahoma, and Kansas. Fortunately, a combination of infrared channels from GOES-16 can be used within an red, green, and blue (i.e. RGB) imagery product to highlight the dust location (bright magenta coloring) both day and night.

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Dust RGB Imagery from GOES-16 at 0257 UTC (~9:57 PM Central) on 23 March 2017 centered on northwestern Texas of the U.S.  Dust plume is identified by magenta coloring while thick cloud features are mostly in tans to reds with other thin clouds in dark shades ranging from purples and blues to black.

 

For the above and subsequent images/animations: NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

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Dust RGB Imagery from 0002 to 0357 UTC, 23 March 2017 centered over western Texas of the U.S.  Blowing dust is colored in magenta.

This “Dust RGB” was originally created by EUMETSAT nearly a decade ago during initial use of the MSG/SEVIRI instrument in order to more efficiently utilize the 3-fold increase of infrared channels available to forecasters. NASA/SPoRT transitioned this Dust RGB to U.S. forecasters via MODIS and VIIRS starting in 2011 in preparation for GOES-16, and this is the first look at geostationary Dust RGB imagery of a major blowing dust event over the southwest CONUS. This event continued into the night when visible imagery was no longer useful.  For this post note the Dust RGB and visible animations below and how the initial development of dust plumes in Mexico are more easily noticed in the Dust RGB around 1700 UTC in magenta while the plume is not readily evident in the visible imagery even at the end of the animation at 1842 UTC.  In addition, the visible imagery shows the thin clouds (orographically-induced) in northern Mexico as very similar in nature to the dust plumes themselves.  However, the Dust RGB shows the thin clouds in blue to black coloring and easily differentiates the dust from the clouds as well as land surface features.

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Dust RGB and visible 0.64 micron imagery from 1617 to 1842 UTC on 23 March 2017 centered over western Texas near the U.S./Mexico border (click on animation to enlarge)

Nighttime Microphysics RGB: Stratus and Fog Cover much of the Great Plains and South, March 2017

Nighttime Microphysics RGB: Stratus and Fog Cover much of the Great Plains and South, March 2017

The development of low clouds and fog over wide areas of the Gulf Coast states and the Great Plains began in the early morning around 0600 UTC on 22 March 2017.  Expansion of these features by 1200 UTC stretched from Texas to Florida in the South and from Oklahoma into the Dakotas along the Great Plains.  These features are easily distinguished in the Nighttime Microphysics (NtMicro) RGB imagery (Fig. 1) from the newly launched GOES-16 imager.  The low cloud/fog range from aqua coloring in the south and become more lime colored toward the colder portions of the Great Plains.  The Pueblo Colorado NWS Weather Forecast Office (PUB) commented on the use of GOES-16 to monitor these low cloud and fog features when considering possible impacts to the public and aviation users.

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Figure 1. Nighttime Microphysics RGB imagery from GOES-16 at 1207 UTC, 22 March 2017 over the CONUS.

For the above image and subsequent animations: NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

The forecast discussion from PUB included this paragraph in the aviation portion:

“GOES-R fog loop shows stratus deck expanding over the plains as of 10z, and expect at least patchy MVFR stratus along and east of I-25 until midday. Western fringe of the cloud deck will likely produce some IFR cigs/vis near the mountains and Palmer divide as clouds push up against higher terrain.”

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Figure 2. GOES-16 “Fog” product (i.e. 3.9 – 11 micron difference) and ceiling/visibility observations.   A default color enhancement is applied to the “Fog” product.  The animated GIF is from 0812 – 1207 UTC, 22 March 2017

The “fog” loop product mentioned above is the channel difference of 3.9-11 microns , and it is shown in the default AWIPS color curve (Fig 2.) where one can see the pink to nearly white features representing negative differences that correspond to low clouds and/or fog.  As anticipated, some MVFR conditions did occur due to ceilings below 3000 ft, and many parts of the Palmer Divide and the Raton Ridge became surrounded by these features.

While the “fog” product shows the various low cloud and fog features, this same capability is found in the “green” component of the Nighttime Microphysics RGB.  This event of low clouds and fog can also be seen in the NtMicro RGB below (Fig. 3) where the land surface and various mid/high clouds are more easily distinguished from the low clouds and fog. This differentiation of features occurs due to additional infrared channels/differences that help to classify cloud thickness and height.  While the event mostly involved low stratus, fog can be seen developing in the low lying areas of southeast Colorado and northeast New Mexico.  Given the improved resolution of GOES-16 in space and time and the availability of more channels compared to legacy GOES imagers, monitoring the fog between in situ observations becomes easier with the NtMicro RGB, and thus allows forecasters to better anticipate impacts to aviation sites and public roadways.

 

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Figure 3. Nighttime Microphysics RGB imagery from GOES-16 from 0812 – 1207 UTC, 22 March 2017 centered on west Kansas.

For more information regarding the Nighttime Microphysics RGB, including interpretation guides for the color features in the imagery:

SPoRT Quick Guide: Nighttime Microphysics RGB in the SPoRT Training Site

SPoRT Nighttime Microphysics RGB Fundamentals (Module) ~20 minutes

 

 

Dust RGB Imagery GOES Beyond Visible

The Dust RGB imagery product was originally developed by EUMETSAT for the MeteoSat Second Generation (MSG) SEVIRI imager and later applied to the JMA Himawari-8 (H8) imager (same as GOES-16). Now the same capabilities are seen with the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI).  NASA/SPoRT has transitioned this product to operational users since 2011 as part of the NOAA Satellite Proving Ground efforts to prepare users for this new geostationary era in the U.S.  SPoRT has co-authored an NWA/JOM article about the impacts this Dust RGB Imagery has already had in operation procedures via use with MODIS and VIIRS instruments. The value of the Dust RGB is the ability the user has to analyze dust plumes when single channel imagery, such as visible channels, do not adequately depict the dust feature.  In addition, true color imagery will often “miss” seeing dust because the underlying surface has a similar color to the dust itself.  And lastly, the Dust RGB allows one to continue monitoring the dust event in both day and night scenes.  Below is an example from a blowing dust event today (March 6, 2017) in the Nebraska and Colorado areas.  Note in the comparison image that the dust (shown in magenta coloring) is readily apparent compared to using single channel visible (0.64 micron, channel 2) imagery alone.  Further below are loops of the imagery for comparison.  Also, note that dry vs. moist air is apparent and another utility of the imagery will be the analysis of drylines in the deep south of the U.S.

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NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

While the Dust RGB Imagery is not intuitive at first, one only has to look at the area over southern Nebraska  (see below) to see a streak of magenta that represents a dust plume.  The Dust RGB uses several infrared-based channels to differentiate various cloud characteristics and dust.  Particularly useful is the difference between channels 15 and 13 (i.e. 12.3 – 10.4 micron difference) that takes advantage of the low absorption by dust in channel 15, which results in a relatively large positive differnce.  This is the red component of the Dust RGB and it causes dust to have a greater amount of red compared to other cloud features.  The magenta color in the RGB results because the dust is relatively warm and the blue component of the RGB is the 10.4 micron channel which is sensitive to the thermal properties of the object.  In addition to the streak across Nebraska, the region of eastern Colorado also has a dust signature in the RGB.  At the time of this imagery, there were 40 kt wind gust and haze reported over this area, but the dewpoint temperatures were below zero degrees Celcius. While no dust was reported in the METAR observations at the time, it’s likely some type of blowing dust was causing the “haze” and some reduced visibility reports.

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NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing. Users receiving these data through any dissemination means  (including, but not limited to, PDA and GRB) assume all risk related to their use of GOES-16 data and NOAA disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Resources for the Dust RGB:

NASA/SPoRT Quick Guide: Dust RGB

SPoRT Application Library: Dust RGB Identifies Aviation Ceiling Hazard at KFMN (micro-lesson)

Nighttime Microphysics for GOES-16

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The Nighttime Microphysics RGB Imagery, provided by S-NPP VIIRS in above image, efficiently highlights the low cloud and fog areas in aqua to dull gray, to allow forecasters to better see where hazards exist to transportation (aviation, public, or marine).  This VIIRS image also provides forecasters with a look at the new geostationary capabilities that will be available soon with GOES-16 ABI.  This Nighttime Microphysics RGB Imagery was originally created by EUMETSAT around 2006, transitioned by NASA/SPoRT to forecasters within the NOAA Satellite Proving Ground over the last 5 years, and recently adopted by GOES-16 as one of the many RGB products that will be available to better utilize the ABI three fold increase in the number of bands over the current GOES imager. Currently, the Nighttime Microphysics RGB Imagery from VIIRS as well as several AVHRR and MODIS instruments is regularly used by forecasters in operations, which has allowed them to gain experience in preparation for this new capability from GOES-16.

On February 8, 2017 Dense Fog Advisories were in place across the Gulf Coast and parts of the Southeast (see image below) and there have been many similar events in the region for this winter.

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Near 1000 UTC (~4:00am CST) large areas of low ceilings and visibility were occurring in the advisory regions, as seen in the first image of the post.  In the images below, take a look at how the Nighttime Microphysics RGB Imagery (this time from NOAA-19/AVHRR) compares to using a single longwave infrared channel in the split scene of the Gulf Coast region and then compare this with the same scene where only the Nighttime Microphysics  RGB Imagery is shown.  Note that the fog and clear areas can look similar in the infrared image and that the fog itself is a bit warmer than the ground areas in Texas. For help interpreting these types of images, NASA/SPoRT has RGB Quick Guides available at  https://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/sport/training/ .

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NtMicro RGB Over N. Gulf

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Low clouds and fog in the N. Gulf and Texas regions caused MVFR/IFR/LIFR conditions over a large area.  The VIIRS Nighttime Microphysics RGB shows aqua to gray coloring to represent these features.  In the RGB the scene is fairly complex with high and middle clouds (reds, blues, purples, tans …..).  The RGB composite uses the traditional 11-3.9um difference (seen below) and combines other channels to better illustrate the low cloud features between the middle/high clouds.  The RGB also improves the characterization of the thick, cold cloud tops associated with the cutoff low producing precipitation along the coast and southern states when compared to the simple 11-3.9um.  Other “microphysical” RGBs are possible during the day or in a form that can be applied both day and night (i.e. 24hr product).

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