High Winds Impacting Olympic Events Captured by NASA/SPoRT Model and Satellite Products

High Winds Impacting Olympic Events Captured by NASA/SPoRT Model and Satellite Products

As summarized in a previous blog post, NASA/SPoRT is providing one of many numerical weather prediction (NWP) model solutions to South Korea during the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games during February and March.  The field campaign is known as the International Collaborative Experiments for PyeongChang 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (ICE-POP). In combination with the suite of radar, satellite, and in situ observations during the field campaign, the SPoRT configuration of the NASA Unified-Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) will serve as a benchmark for future research to improve our understanding of snowfall in complex terrain, our ability to estimate snow using satellites, and for improving prediction models that parameterize these intricate processes.

A key component of the Olympics field campaign is to improve forecast models through comparison to observations and satellite retrieval products.  The constellation of passive microwave imagers being assembled in support of the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission (IMERG) precipitation dataset also provide information on near-surface meteorology necessary to estimate the surface turbulent fluxes. Algorithms designed to retrieve surface temperature, humidity, and wind speed are used together with bulk-flux algorithms to estimate the latent and sensible heat fluxes over the ocean surface. These fluxes are a source of energy and moisture for the overlying atmosphere.  One of the research goals of ICE-POP is to improve heat and moisture fluxes in prediction models through assimilation of these retrieval products.

During this past weekend, the Men’s Downhill Alpine was postponed until Thursday, and the Women’s Giant Slalom Qualifiers were canceled due to high winds that impacted Jeongseon Hill.  Figure 1 shows a 24-hour animation of NU-WRF simulated maximum 10-m wind speeds in 30-minute intervals on 11 February, on the 1-km nested grid centered on the Olympic venues.  We can see a substantial maximum in wind speed impacting the mountains along the eastern Korean Peninsula as well as offshore in the Sea of Japan.  Simulated wind speeds reached 15-20+ m s-1 (~35-45 mph) in the vicinity of Jeongseon and other mountain Olympic locations.  Wind speed observations at nearby Daegwallyeong (north-east of Jeongseon; not shown) peaked around 13 m s-1 (~30 mph) on 11 February, but speeds were most likely stronger in the higher terrain around Jeongseon.  In this particular situation, the higher resolution of the 1-km grid was critical to resolve the fine-scale variations in wind speeds within the complex terrain.

Figure1_maxwind10md03_2018021100_anim

Figure 1.  Twenty-four hour animation of NU-WRF simulated 10-m maximum wind speeds in 30-minute increments, valid from 0000 UTC 11 February through 0000 UTC 12 February 2018.

Meanwhile, the 10-m wind speeds, sensible, and latent heat fluxes are shown in Figure 2, comparing the 9-km model grid simulation with the satellite flux retrievals produced by NASA/SPoRT.  In Figure 2, the retrievals are hourly-averaged composites produced for the ICE-POP campaign, derived from swaths of the constellation of passive microwave satellites.  As the bitter cold Siberian air mass flows over the warmer open waters of the Sea of Japan, Yellow Sea, and western Pacific Ocean, substantial heat and moisture fluxes are directed from the sea surface to the atmosphere.

The 10-m model and retrieved wind speeds both depict a similar broad pattern of high wind speeds up to and exceeding 15 m s-1 across favored corridors downwind of the Korean Peninsula, China, and Russia (Figs. 2a and b).  The model sensible heat flux on the 9-km grid valid at 0600 UTC 12 February (panel c) has a broad pattern similar to the retrieval composite (panel d), but with an axis exceeding 500 W m-2 from the east coast of the Korean Peninsula to central Japan, and a broader amplitude between ~200-400 W m-2, generally higher than the retrievals values  The model latent heat flux (panel e) shows a similar pattern, except for a larger coverage of values exceeding 500 W m-2 between the Korean Peninsula and Japan, and offshore of central and southern Japan.  The maxima offshore of Japan show good agreement between the model and retrieval patterns (panels e and f).

The NU-WRF flux amplitudes are generally higher than that of the retrieval, likely due to several factors such as the retrieval being an hourly-averaged composite compared to instantaneous model fluxes, differences in product resolution, input sea surface temperatures, and model errors in simulated wind speed, and near-surface temperatures and moisture.  Following the Olympics, additional research as part of ICE-POP will involve examining the viability and benefits of assimilating the surface meteorology retrievals into the model for improving the predictions of oceanic heat and moisture transports into the atmosphere and their attendant impacts on air-mass modification.

Figure2_fluxComparison_match

Figure 2. Comparison between NU-WRF 6-h forecast and passive-microwave hourly-averaged composite retrievals of 10-m wind speed (m s-1), sensible, and latent heat flux (W m-2) valid 0600 UTC 11 February 2018. (a) NU-WRF 10-m wind speed, (b) 10-m wind speed retrieval, (c) NU-WRF sensible heat flux, (d) sensible heat flux retrieval, (e) NU-WRF latent heat flux, and (f) latent heat flux retrieval.

Precip Estimates Offshore Using NASA IMERG

If you are near the Gulf Coast, you’ve probably gotten a little drenched over the last few days. In fact, there have been reports of floods and flash floods as a result of the days of heavy rain developing off the coast and moving inland. This season, SPoRT is assessing a new suite of precipitation products derived from NASA’s GPM mission: GPM passive microwave swath rain rates and IMERG, a morphed rain rate product that is available every 30 minutes and also in accumulations. For those of you who aren’t readily familiar with passive microwave rain rate products, here is a quick key point. Passive microwave really shines where our WSR-88ds are totally in the dark, namely over the oceans. Here are some screen captures of the new precip products on AWIPS.

The accumulated IMERG products are helpful to determine how much rain has fallen in radar- and gauge-void regions. According the IMERG 24-hr accumulation estimates (lower right panel), greater than 4 inches of rain had fallen in the 24hr period ending in August 9 at 12Z just south of Tallahassee along the coast and another 3+ inches had fallen south of Melbourne. Just off the coast, there were pockets of 8 and even 12 inches of total rain fall in 24 hours, according to IMERG.

IMERGRR09Aug16_1200Z

For Aug. 9 at 12Z, IMERG instantaneous rain rates are shown in the upper left, IR in the upper right, IMERG 3-hr accumulation in the lower left, and IMERG 24-hr accumulation in the lower right.

The instantaneous rain rate product, shown in the upper left in the above image, can be compared to IR or other imagery or observations to help highlight areas with the heaviest rain fall. Passive microwave is especially sensitive to precipitation-sized ice, so it points out the locations of strong convective updrafts within the larger system, whereas IR is sensitive to the cloud tops and can miss some important components of storm development that lead to heavy rain. Note on the animation below that although the rain rates corresponde well the IR imagery, as it should, the locations of heaviest rain are not always the locations with the coldest cloud top temperatures.

IR_IMERG_animation

Aug. 9 at 14Z, IMERG rain rates are toggled over IR.  Note that the coldest cloud tops don’t always coincide with the heaviest rain rates estimated by IMERG.